Responses to positive affect and unique resting-state connectivity in individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis

Katherine S.F. Damme*, Tina Gupta, Claudia M. Haase, Vijay A. Mittal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis (CHR) report dampened positive affect, while this deficit appears to be an important clinical marker, our current understanding of underlying causes is limited. Dysfunctional regulatory strategies (i.e., abnormal use of dampening, self-focused, or emotion-focused strategies) may account for dampening affect but has not yet been examined. Participants (57 CHR and 56 healthy controls) completed the Response to Positive Affect Scale, clinical interviews, and resting-state scan examining nucleus accumbens (NAcc) connectivity. Individuals at CHR for psychosis showed greater dampening (but no differences in self/emotion-focus) in self-reported response to positive affect compared to healthy controls. In individuals at CHR, higher levels of dampening and lower levels of self-focus were associated with higher positive and lower negative symptoms. Dampening responses were related to decreased dorsal and rostral anterior cingulate cortex-NAcc resting-state connectivity in the CHR group but increased dorsal and rostral anterior cingulate cortex-NAcc resting-state connectivity in the healthy control group. Self-focused responses were related to increased dorsolateral prefrontal cortex-NAcc resting-state connectivity in the CHR group but decreased resting-state connectivity in the healthy control group. Self-reported dampening of positive affect was elevated in individuals at CHR for psychosis. Dampening and self-focused responses were associated with distinct resting-state connectivity compared to peers, suggesting unique mechanisms underlying these emotion regulation strategies. Responses to positive affect may be a useful target for cognitive treatment, but individuals at CHR show distinct neurocorrelates and may require a tailored approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102946
JournalNeuroImage: Clinical
Volume33
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Anterior cingulate cortex
  • Clinical risk for psychosis
  • Emotion regulation
  • Nucleus accumbens
  • Positive affect
  • Resting-state connectivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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