Results of little or no treatment for lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease in children and adolescents

Sharon B. Murphy*, Elaine R. Morgan, Howard M. Katzenstein, Morris Kletzel

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The nodular lymphocyte-predominant form of Hodgkin disease (LPHD) is a distinct clinicopathologic entity with a favorable prognosis. To see if children and adolescents could be spared the adverse sequelae of treatment, the authors adopted a policy of little or no treatment of localized LPHD in 1989. Patients and Methods: Presentation, pathology, and outcomes were reviewed for 15 consecutive children and adolescents with LPHD seen at a single institution since 1989. One patient was lost to follow-up and two patients were seen only once in consultation and treated elsewhere. These three cases were excluded, leaving twelve: nine males and three females, ranging in age at diagnosis from 2 to 17 years (median 11). Eleven of the 12 had stage I disease, and 1 had stage II. Six received no treatment following excisional biopsy, while five received a brief treatment with chemotherapy only. One was initially treated with involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) due to an initially imprecise histologic diagnosis of classic Hodgkin disease. Results: All patients are alive, without evidence of disease, for periods ranging from 2 to 13+ years after diagnosis (median 6 years). One patient recurred locally with LPHD 6 years after initial brief chemotherapy and was then treated with IFRT, achieving a prolonged second remission. Conclusion: Children and adolescents with localized LPHD have an excellent prognosis and may be safely approached either with a wait-and-see attitude of no initial therapy after initial adenectomy or with less aggressive treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)684-687
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
Volume25
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

Fingerprint

Hodgkin Disease
Lymphocytes
Radiotherapy
Therapeutics
Drug Therapy
Lost to Follow-Up
Referral and Consultation
Pathology
Biopsy

Keywords

  • Hodgkin disease
  • Lymphocyte-predominant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

@article{14ec3d676fbd4fbdbefceeb9f893fa91,
title = "Results of little or no treatment for lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease in children and adolescents",
abstract = "Purpose: The nodular lymphocyte-predominant form of Hodgkin disease (LPHD) is a distinct clinicopathologic entity with a favorable prognosis. To see if children and adolescents could be spared the adverse sequelae of treatment, the authors adopted a policy of little or no treatment of localized LPHD in 1989. Patients and Methods: Presentation, pathology, and outcomes were reviewed for 15 consecutive children and adolescents with LPHD seen at a single institution since 1989. One patient was lost to follow-up and two patients were seen only once in consultation and treated elsewhere. These three cases were excluded, leaving twelve: nine males and three females, ranging in age at diagnosis from 2 to 17 years (median 11). Eleven of the 12 had stage I disease, and 1 had stage II. Six received no treatment following excisional biopsy, while five received a brief treatment with chemotherapy only. One was initially treated with involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) due to an initially imprecise histologic diagnosis of classic Hodgkin disease. Results: All patients are alive, without evidence of disease, for periods ranging from 2 to 13+ years after diagnosis (median 6 years). One patient recurred locally with LPHD 6 years after initial brief chemotherapy and was then treated with IFRT, achieving a prolonged second remission. Conclusion: Children and adolescents with localized LPHD have an excellent prognosis and may be safely approached either with a wait-and-see attitude of no initial therapy after initial adenectomy or with less aggressive treatments.",
keywords = "Hodgkin disease, Lymphocyte-predominant",
author = "Murphy, {Sharon B.} and Morgan, {Elaine R.} and Katzenstein, {Howard M.} and Morris Kletzel",
year = "2003",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00043426-200309000-00003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "684--687",
journal = "Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology",
issn = "1077-4114",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "9",

}

Results of little or no treatment for lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease in children and adolescents. / Murphy, Sharon B.; Morgan, Elaine R.; Katzenstein, Howard M.; Kletzel, Morris.

In: Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Vol. 25, No. 9, 01.09.2003, p. 684-687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Results of little or no treatment for lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease in children and adolescents

AU - Murphy, Sharon B.

AU - Morgan, Elaine R.

AU - Katzenstein, Howard M.

AU - Kletzel, Morris

PY - 2003/9/1

Y1 - 2003/9/1

N2 - Purpose: The nodular lymphocyte-predominant form of Hodgkin disease (LPHD) is a distinct clinicopathologic entity with a favorable prognosis. To see if children and adolescents could be spared the adverse sequelae of treatment, the authors adopted a policy of little or no treatment of localized LPHD in 1989. Patients and Methods: Presentation, pathology, and outcomes were reviewed for 15 consecutive children and adolescents with LPHD seen at a single institution since 1989. One patient was lost to follow-up and two patients were seen only once in consultation and treated elsewhere. These three cases were excluded, leaving twelve: nine males and three females, ranging in age at diagnosis from 2 to 17 years (median 11). Eleven of the 12 had stage I disease, and 1 had stage II. Six received no treatment following excisional biopsy, while five received a brief treatment with chemotherapy only. One was initially treated with involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) due to an initially imprecise histologic diagnosis of classic Hodgkin disease. Results: All patients are alive, without evidence of disease, for periods ranging from 2 to 13+ years after diagnosis (median 6 years). One patient recurred locally with LPHD 6 years after initial brief chemotherapy and was then treated with IFRT, achieving a prolonged second remission. Conclusion: Children and adolescents with localized LPHD have an excellent prognosis and may be safely approached either with a wait-and-see attitude of no initial therapy after initial adenectomy or with less aggressive treatments.

AB - Purpose: The nodular lymphocyte-predominant form of Hodgkin disease (LPHD) is a distinct clinicopathologic entity with a favorable prognosis. To see if children and adolescents could be spared the adverse sequelae of treatment, the authors adopted a policy of little or no treatment of localized LPHD in 1989. Patients and Methods: Presentation, pathology, and outcomes were reviewed for 15 consecutive children and adolescents with LPHD seen at a single institution since 1989. One patient was lost to follow-up and two patients were seen only once in consultation and treated elsewhere. These three cases were excluded, leaving twelve: nine males and three females, ranging in age at diagnosis from 2 to 17 years (median 11). Eleven of the 12 had stage I disease, and 1 had stage II. Six received no treatment following excisional biopsy, while five received a brief treatment with chemotherapy only. One was initially treated with involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) due to an initially imprecise histologic diagnosis of classic Hodgkin disease. Results: All patients are alive, without evidence of disease, for periods ranging from 2 to 13+ years after diagnosis (median 6 years). One patient recurred locally with LPHD 6 years after initial brief chemotherapy and was then treated with IFRT, achieving a prolonged second remission. Conclusion: Children and adolescents with localized LPHD have an excellent prognosis and may be safely approached either with a wait-and-see attitude of no initial therapy after initial adenectomy or with less aggressive treatments.

KW - Hodgkin disease

KW - Lymphocyte-predominant

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0041733727&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0041733727&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00043426-200309000-00003

DO - 10.1097/00043426-200309000-00003

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 684

EP - 687

JO - Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

JF - Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

SN - 1077-4114

IS - 9

ER -