Rethinking student participation in the college classroom: Can commitment and self-affirmation enhance oral participation?

Ken Sereno, Nathan Walter*, John J. Brooks

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The literature suggests that in-class oral participation is associated with various positive outcomes that directly contribute to academic success. The goal of the current study was to investigate the role played by psychological barriers to oral participation, focusing on commitment and self-affirmation as methods to bypass barriers to participation. The results of the semester-long experiment (N = 157) demonstrate that committed individuals who had an opportunity to self-affirm outperformed both committed students and affirmed students, as well as members of the control group. Interestingly, the interplay between self-affirmation and commitment increased oral participation, irrespective of whether students had high or low self-esteem and high or low self-efficacy. The current results offer some room for cautious optimism, as they highlight the importance of self-affirmation and commitment as a route to academic success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-362
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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