Rethinking the design of robotic pets for older adults

Amanda Lazar, Hilaire J. Thompson, Anne Marie Piper, George Demiris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Robots are seen as a potential solution to the perceived needs of the aging population. Thus far, research has primarily focused on robotics for the functional and emotional support of older adults. Robotic pets have been developed primarily for the older adult who is perceived as lonely and isolated, and fears have consequently arisen that robots will replace human caregivers and deceive older adults into developing relationships with them. Missing is the perspective of older adults on the ethics of and potential uses for robotic companion pets. In this study, we conducted focus groups with 41 older adults. We discuss concepts raised by focus group participants such as giving into the fiction of the robotic pet, the social role of the robot, and the role of reciprocity in building a relationship with a robotic pet. We present resulting considerations for new directions for robotic pet design for older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDIS 2016 - Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems
Subtitle of host publicationFuse
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages1034-1046
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9781450340311
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 4 2016
Event11th ACM SIGCHI Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, DIS 2016 - Brisbane, Australia
Duration: Jun 4 2016Jun 8 2016

Publication series

NameDIS 2016 - Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Fuse

Other

Other11th ACM SIGCHI Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, DIS 2016
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period6/4/166/8/16

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Older adults
  • Robots

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software

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