Review of the formulation and applications of the finite-difference time-domain method for numerical modeling of electromagnetic wave interactions with arbitrary structures

Allen Taflove*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

223 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper reviews the basis and applications of the finite-difference time -domain (FD-TD) numerical modeling approach for Maxwell's equations. FD-TD is very simple in concept and execution. However, it is remarkably robust, providing highly accurate modeling predictions for a wide variety of electromagnetic wave interaction problems. The accuracy and breadth of FD-TD applications will be illustrated by a number of two- and three-dimensional examples. The objects modeled range in nature from simple geometric shapes to extremely complex aerospace and biological systems. In all cases where rigorous analytical, code-to-code, or experimental validations are possible, FD-TD predictive data for penetrating and scattered near fields as well as radar cross sections are in excellent agreement with the benchmarks. It will also be shown that opportunities are arising in applying FD-TD to model rapidly time-varying systems, microwave circuits, and inverse scattering. With continuing advances in FD-TD modeling theory as well as continuing advances in supercomputer technology, there is a strong possibility that FD-TD numerical modeling will occupy an important place in high-frequency engineering electromagnetics as we move into the 1990s.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)547-582
Number of pages36
JournalWave Motion
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Computational Mathematics
  • Applied Mathematics

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