Review of yoga therapy during cancer treatment

Suzanne C. Danhauer*, Elizabeth L. Addington, Stephanie J. Sohl, Alejandro Chaoul, Lorenzo Cohen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Reviews of yoga research that distinguish results of trials conducted during (versus after) cancer treatment are needed to guide future research and clinical practice. We therefore conducted a review of non-randomized studies and randomized controlled trials of yoga interventions for children and adults undergoing treatment for any cancer type. Methods: Studies were identified via research databases and reference lists. Inclusion criteria were the following: (1) children or adults undergoing cancer treatment, (2) intervention stated as yoga or component of yoga, and (3) publication in English in peer-reviewed journals through October 2015. Exclusion criteria were the following: (1) samples receiving hormone therapy only, (2) interventions involving meditation only, and (3) yoga delivered within broader cancer recovery or mindfulness-based stress reduction programs. Results: Results of non-randomized (adult n = 8, pediatric n = 4) and randomized controlled trials (adult n = 13, pediatric n = 0) conducted during cancer treatment are summarized separately by age group. Findings most consistently support improvement in psychological outcomes (e.g., depression, distress, anxiety). Several studies also found that yoga enhanced quality of life, though further investigation is needed to clarify domain-specific efficacy (e.g., physical, social, cancer-specific). Regarding physical and biomedical outcomes, evidence increasingly suggests that yoga ameliorates sleep and fatigue; additional research is needed to advance preliminary findings for other treatment sequelae and stress/immunity biomarkers. Conclusions: Among adults undergoing cancer treatment, evidence supports recommending yoga for improving psychological outcomes, with potential for also improving physical symptoms. Evidence is insufficient to evaluate the efficacy of yoga in pediatric oncology. We describe suggestions for strengthening yoga research methodology to inform clinical practice guidelines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1357-1372
Number of pages16
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

Yoga
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Pediatrics
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research
Psychology
Mindfulness
Meditation
Practice Guidelines
Fatigue
Publications
Immunity
Sleep
Research Design
Anxiety
Age Groups
Biomarkers
Quality of Life
Databases

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Chemotherapy
  • Mind-body
  • Radiation therapy
  • Symptoms
  • Yoga

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Danhauer, Suzanne C. ; Addington, Elizabeth L. ; Sohl, Stephanie J. ; Chaoul, Alejandro ; Cohen, Lorenzo. / Review of yoga therapy during cancer treatment. In: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2017 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 1357-1372.
@article{e6480a5addac401f986a836e1eea09fc,
title = "Review of yoga therapy during cancer treatment",
abstract = "Purpose: Reviews of yoga research that distinguish results of trials conducted during (versus after) cancer treatment are needed to guide future research and clinical practice. We therefore conducted a review of non-randomized studies and randomized controlled trials of yoga interventions for children and adults undergoing treatment for any cancer type. Methods: Studies were identified via research databases and reference lists. Inclusion criteria were the following: (1) children or adults undergoing cancer treatment, (2) intervention stated as yoga or component of yoga, and (3) publication in English in peer-reviewed journals through October 2015. Exclusion criteria were the following: (1) samples receiving hormone therapy only, (2) interventions involving meditation only, and (3) yoga delivered within broader cancer recovery or mindfulness-based stress reduction programs. Results: Results of non-randomized (adult n = 8, pediatric n = 4) and randomized controlled trials (adult n = 13, pediatric n = 0) conducted during cancer treatment are summarized separately by age group. Findings most consistently support improvement in psychological outcomes (e.g., depression, distress, anxiety). Several studies also found that yoga enhanced quality of life, though further investigation is needed to clarify domain-specific efficacy (e.g., physical, social, cancer-specific). Regarding physical and biomedical outcomes, evidence increasingly suggests that yoga ameliorates sleep and fatigue; additional research is needed to advance preliminary findings for other treatment sequelae and stress/immunity biomarkers. Conclusions: Among adults undergoing cancer treatment, evidence supports recommending yoga for improving psychological outcomes, with potential for also improving physical symptoms. Evidence is insufficient to evaluate the efficacy of yoga in pediatric oncology. We describe suggestions for strengthening yoga research methodology to inform clinical practice guidelines.",
keywords = "Cancer, Chemotherapy, Mind-body, Radiation therapy, Symptoms, Yoga",
author = "Danhauer, {Suzanne C.} and Addington, {Elizabeth L.} and Sohl, {Stephanie J.} and Alejandro Chaoul and Lorenzo Cohen",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00520-016-3556-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "1357--1372",
journal = "Supportive Care in Cancer",
issn = "0941-4355",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "4",

}

Danhauer, SC, Addington, EL, Sohl, SJ, Chaoul, A & Cohen, L 2017, 'Review of yoga therapy during cancer treatment', Supportive Care in Cancer, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 1357-1372. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-016-3556-9

Review of yoga therapy during cancer treatment. / Danhauer, Suzanne C.; Addington, Elizabeth L.; Sohl, Stephanie J.; Chaoul, Alejandro; Cohen, Lorenzo.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 1357-1372.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Review of yoga therapy during cancer treatment

AU - Danhauer, Suzanne C.

AU - Addington, Elizabeth L.

AU - Sohl, Stephanie J.

AU - Chaoul, Alejandro

AU - Cohen, Lorenzo

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - Purpose: Reviews of yoga research that distinguish results of trials conducted during (versus after) cancer treatment are needed to guide future research and clinical practice. We therefore conducted a review of non-randomized studies and randomized controlled trials of yoga interventions for children and adults undergoing treatment for any cancer type. Methods: Studies were identified via research databases and reference lists. Inclusion criteria were the following: (1) children or adults undergoing cancer treatment, (2) intervention stated as yoga or component of yoga, and (3) publication in English in peer-reviewed journals through October 2015. Exclusion criteria were the following: (1) samples receiving hormone therapy only, (2) interventions involving meditation only, and (3) yoga delivered within broader cancer recovery or mindfulness-based stress reduction programs. Results: Results of non-randomized (adult n = 8, pediatric n = 4) and randomized controlled trials (adult n = 13, pediatric n = 0) conducted during cancer treatment are summarized separately by age group. Findings most consistently support improvement in psychological outcomes (e.g., depression, distress, anxiety). Several studies also found that yoga enhanced quality of life, though further investigation is needed to clarify domain-specific efficacy (e.g., physical, social, cancer-specific). Regarding physical and biomedical outcomes, evidence increasingly suggests that yoga ameliorates sleep and fatigue; additional research is needed to advance preliminary findings for other treatment sequelae and stress/immunity biomarkers. Conclusions: Among adults undergoing cancer treatment, evidence supports recommending yoga for improving psychological outcomes, with potential for also improving physical symptoms. Evidence is insufficient to evaluate the efficacy of yoga in pediatric oncology. We describe suggestions for strengthening yoga research methodology to inform clinical practice guidelines.

AB - Purpose: Reviews of yoga research that distinguish results of trials conducted during (versus after) cancer treatment are needed to guide future research and clinical practice. We therefore conducted a review of non-randomized studies and randomized controlled trials of yoga interventions for children and adults undergoing treatment for any cancer type. Methods: Studies were identified via research databases and reference lists. Inclusion criteria were the following: (1) children or adults undergoing cancer treatment, (2) intervention stated as yoga or component of yoga, and (3) publication in English in peer-reviewed journals through October 2015. Exclusion criteria were the following: (1) samples receiving hormone therapy only, (2) interventions involving meditation only, and (3) yoga delivered within broader cancer recovery or mindfulness-based stress reduction programs. Results: Results of non-randomized (adult n = 8, pediatric n = 4) and randomized controlled trials (adult n = 13, pediatric n = 0) conducted during cancer treatment are summarized separately by age group. Findings most consistently support improvement in psychological outcomes (e.g., depression, distress, anxiety). Several studies also found that yoga enhanced quality of life, though further investigation is needed to clarify domain-specific efficacy (e.g., physical, social, cancer-specific). Regarding physical and biomedical outcomes, evidence increasingly suggests that yoga ameliorates sleep and fatigue; additional research is needed to advance preliminary findings for other treatment sequelae and stress/immunity biomarkers. Conclusions: Among adults undergoing cancer treatment, evidence supports recommending yoga for improving psychological outcomes, with potential for also improving physical symptoms. Evidence is insufficient to evaluate the efficacy of yoga in pediatric oncology. We describe suggestions for strengthening yoga research methodology to inform clinical practice guidelines.

KW - Cancer

KW - Chemotherapy

KW - Mind-body

KW - Radiation therapy

KW - Symptoms

KW - Yoga

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85008514397&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85008514397&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00520-016-3556-9

DO - 10.1007/s00520-016-3556-9

M3 - Review article

VL - 25

SP - 1357

EP - 1372

JO - Supportive Care in Cancer

JF - Supportive Care in Cancer

SN - 0941-4355

IS - 4

ER -