Reward Responsiveness and Ruminative Styles Interact to Predict Inflammation and Mood Symptomatology

Daniel P. Moriarity, Tommy Ng, Madison K. Titone, Iris K.Y. Chat, Robin Nusslock, Gregory E. Miller, Lauren B. Alloy*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abnormal reward responsiveness and rumination each are associated with elevated inflammation and mood symptoms. Ruminating on positive and negative affect, or dampening positive affect, may amplify, or buffer, the associations of reward hyper/hyposensitivity with inflammation and mood symptoms. Young adults (N = 109) with high or moderate reward sensitivity completed reward responsiveness and ruminative style measures at the initial visit of a longitudinal study of mood symptoms, a blood draw to assess inflammatory biomarkers, and mood symptom measures at the study visits before and after the day of the blood draw. The interaction between high reward responsiveness and rumination on positive affect was associated with higher levels of an inflammatory composite measure and hypomanic symptoms. The interaction between lower reward responsiveness and high dampening of positive affect was associated with higher levels of the inflammatory composite measure and depressive symptoms. Lower reward responsiveness also interacted with low rumination on positive affect to predict increases in depressive symptoms and higher levels of the inflammatory composite. Thus, levels of reward responsiveness and ruminative response styles may synergistically influence the development of inflammatory phenotypes and both hypomanic and depressive mood symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)829-842
Number of pages14
JournalBehavior Therapy
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • depression
  • hypomania
  • inflammation
  • reward responsiveness
  • rumination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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