Risk Factors Associated With Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection in Neurogenic Bladders Managed by Clean Intermittent Catheterization

Rajeev Chaudhry, Zarine R. Balsara, Ramiro J. Madden-Fuentes, John S. Wiener, Jonathan C. Routh, Patrick Seed, Sherry S. Ross*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To identify risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients who perform clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). Methods A 6-year retrospective chart review of patients with spina bifida or tethered cord who perform clean intermittent catheterization (8 months to 58 years) was conducted. A strict case definition for UTI was applied, and per-subject UTI events, demographic, and clinical data were abstracted. Data were compared between groups defined by no or infrequent UTI (≤1.0 UTI/study year) and frequent UTI (>1.0 UTI/study year). Results Of 194 total patients, 146 (75%) had no UTIs or infrequent UTIs, and 48 (25%) patients had frequent UTIs. On univariate analysis, only younger age and suprasacral cord lesions were associated with frequent UTIs (P =.002 and P =.007, respectively). Among the 128 patients with urodynamic studies, bladder capacity, compliance, detrusor overactivity, and detrusor leak point pressure were not associated with frequent UTI on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, increasing age was found to be associated with decreased odds of UTI by 7% per year (odds ratio 0.93, P =.016). Conclusion The risk of UTI among individuals with spina bifida or tethered cord declines with increasing age. Bladder function based on urodynamic parameters did not correlate with frequent UTIs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-218
Number of pages6
JournalUrology
Volume102
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

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Intermittent Urethral Catheterization
Neurogenic Urinary Bladder
Urinary Tract Infections
Spinal Dysraphism
Urodynamics
Urinary Bladder
Compliance
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Chaudhry, Rajeev ; Balsara, Zarine R. ; Madden-Fuentes, Ramiro J. ; Wiener, John S. ; Routh, Jonathan C. ; Seed, Patrick ; Ross, Sherry S. / Risk Factors Associated With Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection in Neurogenic Bladders Managed by Clean Intermittent Catheterization. In: Urology. 2017 ; Vol. 102. pp. 213-218.
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abstract = "Objective To identify risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients who perform clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). Methods A 6-year retrospective chart review of patients with spina bifida or tethered cord who perform clean intermittent catheterization (8 months to 58 years) was conducted. A strict case definition for UTI was applied, and per-subject UTI events, demographic, and clinical data were abstracted. Data were compared between groups defined by no or infrequent UTI (≤1.0 UTI/study year) and frequent UTI (>1.0 UTI/study year). Results Of 194 total patients, 146 (75{\%}) had no UTIs or infrequent UTIs, and 48 (25{\%}) patients had frequent UTIs. On univariate analysis, only younger age and suprasacral cord lesions were associated with frequent UTIs (P =.002 and P =.007, respectively). Among the 128 patients with urodynamic studies, bladder capacity, compliance, detrusor overactivity, and detrusor leak point pressure were not associated with frequent UTI on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, increasing age was found to be associated with decreased odds of UTI by 7{\%} per year (odds ratio 0.93, P =.016). Conclusion The risk of UTI among individuals with spina bifida or tethered cord declines with increasing age. Bladder function based on urodynamic parameters did not correlate with frequent UTIs.",
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Risk Factors Associated With Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection in Neurogenic Bladders Managed by Clean Intermittent Catheterization. / Chaudhry, Rajeev; Balsara, Zarine R.; Madden-Fuentes, Ramiro J.; Wiener, John S.; Routh, Jonathan C.; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S.

In: Urology, Vol. 102, 01.04.2017, p. 213-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Risk Factors Associated With Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection in Neurogenic Bladders Managed by Clean Intermittent Catheterization

AU - Chaudhry, Rajeev

AU - Balsara, Zarine R.

AU - Madden-Fuentes, Ramiro J.

AU - Wiener, John S.

AU - Routh, Jonathan C.

AU - Seed, Patrick

AU - Ross, Sherry S.

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N2 - Objective To identify risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients who perform clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). Methods A 6-year retrospective chart review of patients with spina bifida or tethered cord who perform clean intermittent catheterization (8 months to 58 years) was conducted. A strict case definition for UTI was applied, and per-subject UTI events, demographic, and clinical data were abstracted. Data were compared between groups defined by no or infrequent UTI (≤1.0 UTI/study year) and frequent UTI (>1.0 UTI/study year). Results Of 194 total patients, 146 (75%) had no UTIs or infrequent UTIs, and 48 (25%) patients had frequent UTIs. On univariate analysis, only younger age and suprasacral cord lesions were associated with frequent UTIs (P =.002 and P =.007, respectively). Among the 128 patients with urodynamic studies, bladder capacity, compliance, detrusor overactivity, and detrusor leak point pressure were not associated with frequent UTI on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, increasing age was found to be associated with decreased odds of UTI by 7% per year (odds ratio 0.93, P =.016). Conclusion The risk of UTI among individuals with spina bifida or tethered cord declines with increasing age. Bladder function based on urodynamic parameters did not correlate with frequent UTIs.

AB - Objective To identify risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients who perform clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). Methods A 6-year retrospective chart review of patients with spina bifida or tethered cord who perform clean intermittent catheterization (8 months to 58 years) was conducted. A strict case definition for UTI was applied, and per-subject UTI events, demographic, and clinical data were abstracted. Data were compared between groups defined by no or infrequent UTI (≤1.0 UTI/study year) and frequent UTI (>1.0 UTI/study year). Results Of 194 total patients, 146 (75%) had no UTIs or infrequent UTIs, and 48 (25%) patients had frequent UTIs. On univariate analysis, only younger age and suprasacral cord lesions were associated with frequent UTIs (P =.002 and P =.007, respectively). Among the 128 patients with urodynamic studies, bladder capacity, compliance, detrusor overactivity, and detrusor leak point pressure were not associated with frequent UTI on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, increasing age was found to be associated with decreased odds of UTI by 7% per year (odds ratio 0.93, P =.016). Conclusion The risk of UTI among individuals with spina bifida or tethered cord declines with increasing age. Bladder function based on urodynamic parameters did not correlate with frequent UTIs.

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