Risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections in a neonatal intensive care unit

Luan Ying Tian*, Aaron Hamvas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To assess the risk factors for nosocomial blood-stream infection (BSI) in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods: Clinical data from the neonates admitted to the NICU in the St. Louis Children's Hospital in Washington University School of Medicine between January 2005 and December 2006 were retrospectively studied. Results: A total of 1 290 neonates were included. Overall, 175 nosocomial BSIs occurred. Catheter-related BSIs accounted for 62.3% (109 cases). The incidence of nosocomial BSI was 4.22 per 1 000 patient-days. Logistic regression analysis revealed that low gestational age, low Apgar scores at 5 minutes, use of central venous catheter (CVC), and longer CVC use were risk factors for the development of nosocomial BSI. In the subgroup of neonates with CVC, mechanical ventilation was an additional independent risk factor for BSI. Conclusions: Catheter-related BSI is the major source of nosocomial BSI in the NICU. Prematurity, low Apgar scores at birth and prolonged CVC use are risk factors for the development of BSI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-624+629
JournalChinese Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics
Volume12
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

Keywords

  • Intensive care unit
  • Neonate
  • Nosocomial bloodstream infection
  • Risk factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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