Risk of obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with glycaemia status in South Asian men and women in the United States

Rupinder Deol, Kathryn A. Lee, Namratha R Kandula, Alka M. Kanaya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims To examine the association between glycaemia status and the risk for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in a cohort of South Asians living in the United States. Methods A secondary analysis of a community based cohort of 899 participants from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study. The Berlin Questionnaire was used to screen for OSA. Results Almost one in four (24%) South Asians was at high risk for OSA. Compared to the normal glucose tolerance group (18%), high risk of OSA was significantly more likely in the prediabetes (24%) and diabetes (32%) groups (p = 0.007). More men (28%) than women (18%) were at high risk of OSA. Risk for OSA was also associated with higher haemoglobin A1c values, hypertension, large waist circumference, and BMI >27.5 kg/m2. In a multivariate regression analysis, sleep disordered breathing (SDB) remained significantly associated with higher haemoglobin A1c values, even after controlling for waist circumference and other demographic and clinical factors. Conclusions The risk for SDB and OSA was high among South Asian men and women. Given the association between dysglycaemia and risk for OSA, these health issues require simultaneous clinical assessment. Future studies using objective sleep measures such as polysomnography are warranted in the diagnosis and treatment of OSA in the South Asian adult population already at high risk for dysglycaemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalObesity Medicine
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Waist Circumference
Hemoglobins
Prediabetic State
Polysomnography
Berlin
Atherosclerosis
Sleep
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis
Demography
Hypertension
Glucose
Health

Keywords

  • Obesity
  • Obstructive sleep apnoea
  • Pre-diabetes
  • Sleep disordered breathing
  • South Asian immigrants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Risk of obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with glycaemia status in South Asian men and women in the United States",
abstract = "Aims To examine the association between glycaemia status and the risk for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in a cohort of South Asians living in the United States. Methods A secondary analysis of a community based cohort of 899 participants from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study. The Berlin Questionnaire was used to screen for OSA. Results Almost one in four (24{\%}) South Asians was at high risk for OSA. Compared to the normal glucose tolerance group (18{\%}), high risk of OSA was significantly more likely in the prediabetes (24{\%}) and diabetes (32{\%}) groups (p = 0.007). More men (28{\%}) than women (18{\%}) were at high risk of OSA. Risk for OSA was also associated with higher haemoglobin A1c values, hypertension, large waist circumference, and BMI >27.5 kg/m2. In a multivariate regression analysis, sleep disordered breathing (SDB) remained significantly associated with higher haemoglobin A1c values, even after controlling for waist circumference and other demographic and clinical factors. Conclusions The risk for SDB and OSA was high among South Asian men and women. Given the association between dysglycaemia and risk for OSA, these health issues require simultaneous clinical assessment. Future studies using objective sleep measures such as polysomnography are warranted in the diagnosis and treatment of OSA in the South Asian adult population already at high risk for dysglycaemia.",
keywords = "Obesity, Obstructive sleep apnoea, Pre-diabetes, Sleep disordered breathing, South Asian immigrants",
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Risk of obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with glycaemia status in South Asian men and women in the United States. / Deol, Rupinder; Lee, Kathryn A.; Kandula, Namratha R; Kanaya, Alka M.

In: Obesity Medicine, Vol. 9, 01.03.2018, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk of obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with glycaemia status in South Asian men and women in the United States

AU - Deol, Rupinder

AU - Lee, Kathryn A.

AU - Kandula, Namratha R

AU - Kanaya, Alka M.

PY - 2018/3/1

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N2 - Aims To examine the association between glycaemia status and the risk for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in a cohort of South Asians living in the United States. Methods A secondary analysis of a community based cohort of 899 participants from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study. The Berlin Questionnaire was used to screen for OSA. Results Almost one in four (24%) South Asians was at high risk for OSA. Compared to the normal glucose tolerance group (18%), high risk of OSA was significantly more likely in the prediabetes (24%) and diabetes (32%) groups (p = 0.007). More men (28%) than women (18%) were at high risk of OSA. Risk for OSA was also associated with higher haemoglobin A1c values, hypertension, large waist circumference, and BMI >27.5 kg/m2. In a multivariate regression analysis, sleep disordered breathing (SDB) remained significantly associated with higher haemoglobin A1c values, even after controlling for waist circumference and other demographic and clinical factors. Conclusions The risk for SDB and OSA was high among South Asian men and women. Given the association between dysglycaemia and risk for OSA, these health issues require simultaneous clinical assessment. Future studies using objective sleep measures such as polysomnography are warranted in the diagnosis and treatment of OSA in the South Asian adult population already at high risk for dysglycaemia.

AB - Aims To examine the association between glycaemia status and the risk for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in a cohort of South Asians living in the United States. Methods A secondary analysis of a community based cohort of 899 participants from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study. The Berlin Questionnaire was used to screen for OSA. Results Almost one in four (24%) South Asians was at high risk for OSA. Compared to the normal glucose tolerance group (18%), high risk of OSA was significantly more likely in the prediabetes (24%) and diabetes (32%) groups (p = 0.007). More men (28%) than women (18%) were at high risk of OSA. Risk for OSA was also associated with higher haemoglobin A1c values, hypertension, large waist circumference, and BMI >27.5 kg/m2. In a multivariate regression analysis, sleep disordered breathing (SDB) remained significantly associated with higher haemoglobin A1c values, even after controlling for waist circumference and other demographic and clinical factors. Conclusions The risk for SDB and OSA was high among South Asian men and women. Given the association between dysglycaemia and risk for OSA, these health issues require simultaneous clinical assessment. Future studies using objective sleep measures such as polysomnography are warranted in the diagnosis and treatment of OSA in the South Asian adult population already at high risk for dysglycaemia.

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