Role of nucleus accumbens in neuropathic pain: Linked multi-scale evidence in the rat transitioning to neuropathic pain

Pei Ching Chang, Sarah Lynn Pollema-Mays, Maria Virginia Centeno, Daniele Procissi, Massimo Contini, Alex Tomas Baria, Marco Martina, Apkar Apkarian*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite recent evidence implicating the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as causally involved in the transition to chronic pain in humans, underlying mechanisms of this involvement remain entirely unknown. Here we elucidate mechanisms of NAc reorganizational properties (longitudinally and cross-sectionally), in an animal model of neuropathic pain (spared nerve injury [SNI]). We observed interrelated changes: (1) In resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), functional connectivity of the NAc to dorsal striatum and cortex was reduced 28 days (but not 5 days) after SNI; (2) Contralateral to SNI injury, gene expression of NAc dopamine 1A, 2, and κ-opioid receptors decreased 28 days after SNI; (3) In SNI (but not sham), covariance of gene expression was upregulated at 5 days and settled to a new state at 28 days; and (4) NAc functional connectivity correlated with dopamine receptor gene expression and with tactile allodynia. Moreover, interruption of NAc activity (via lidocaine infusion) reversibly alleviated neuropathic pain in SNI animals. Together, these results demonstrate macroscopic (fMRI) and molecular reorganization of NAc and indicate that NAc neuronal activity is necessary for full expression of neuropathic pain-like behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1128-1139
Number of pages12
JournalPain
Volume155
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Nucleus Accumbens
Neuralgia
Wounds and Injuries
Gene Expression
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Hyperalgesia
Dopamine Receptors
Opioid Receptors
Lidocaine
Chronic Pain
Dopamine
Animal Models

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Allodynia
  • Dopamine
  • Opioid
  • Resting state
  • fMRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Chang, Pei Ching ; Pollema-Mays, Sarah Lynn ; Centeno, Maria Virginia ; Procissi, Daniele ; Contini, Massimo ; Baria, Alex Tomas ; Martina, Marco ; Apkarian, Apkar. / Role of nucleus accumbens in neuropathic pain : Linked multi-scale evidence in the rat transitioning to neuropathic pain. In: Pain. 2014 ; Vol. 155, No. 6. pp. 1128-1139.
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Role of nucleus accumbens in neuropathic pain : Linked multi-scale evidence in the rat transitioning to neuropathic pain. / Chang, Pei Ching; Pollema-Mays, Sarah Lynn; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Procissi, Daniele; Contini, Massimo; Baria, Alex Tomas; Martina, Marco; Apkarian, Apkar.

In: Pain, Vol. 155, No. 6, 01.01.2014, p. 1128-1139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Chang, Pei Ching

AU - Pollema-Mays, Sarah Lynn

AU - Centeno, Maria Virginia

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AU - Martina, Marco

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