Routine hepatitis C virus screening in pregnancy: A cost-effectiveness analysis

Beth A. Plunkett*, William A Grobman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether routine hepatitis C virus screening in pregnancy is cost-effective. Study design: A decision tree with Markov analysis was developed to compare 3 approaches to asymptomatic hepatitis C virus infection in low-risk pregnant women: (1) no hepatitis C virus screening, (2) hepatitis C virus screening and subsequent treatment for progressive disease, and (3) hepatitis C virus screening, subsequent treatment for progressive disease, and elective cesarean delivery to avert perinatal transmission. Lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life years were evaluated for mother and child. Results: In our base case, hepatitis C virus screening and subsequent treatment of progressive disease was dominated (more costly and less effective) by no screening, with an incremental cost of $108 and a decreased incremental effectiveness of 0.00011 quality-adjusted life years. When compared with no screening, the marginal cost and effectiveness of screening, treatment, and cesarean delivery was $117 and 0.00010 quality-adjusted life years, respectively, which yields a cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,170,000 per quality-adjusted life year. Conclusion: The screening of asymptomatic pregnant women for hepatitis C virus infection is not cost-effective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1153-1161
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume192
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Keywords

  • Cost-effective
  • Hepatitis C
  • Pregnancy
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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