Routine imaging guided by a 31-gene expression profile assay results in earlier detection of melanoma with decreased metastatic tumor burden compared to patients without surveillance imaging studies

Soneet Dhillon, Daniela Duarte-Bateman, Graham Fowler, Michael Norman Eun Hagstrom, Nathaniel Lampley, Shantel Olivares, Mónica Stella Fumero-Velázquez, Kathryn Vu, Jeffrey D. Wayne, Brian R. Gastman, John Vetto, Pedram Gerami*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patients with early-stage disease typically have a good prognosis, but still have a risk of recurrence, even with negative sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). This study explores the utility of routine imaging to detect metastases in patients with negative SLNB but high-risk 31 gene expression profile (31-GEP) scores. We retrospectively identified melanoma patients with negative SLNBs. Patients with high-risk GEP results were placed in the experimental group and patients without GEP testing were placed in the control group. Among both cohorts, recurrent melanoma groups were identified. The tumor burden at the time of recurrence and the time to recurrence were compared between experimental group patients with routine imaging and control group patients without imaging schedules. We identified 327 control patients and 307 experimental patients, of which 14.1% versus 20.5% had melanoma recurrence, respectively. Of the patients with recurrent melanoma, those in the experimental group were older (65.75 versus 59.20), had higher Breslow depths (3.72 mm versus 3.31 mm), and had advanced tumor staging (89.5% versus 71.4% of patients presenting clinical stage ≥ II) compared to the control group at primary diagnosis. However, melanoma recurrence was detected earlier (25.50 months versus 35.35 months) in the experimental group at a lower overall tumor burden (73.10 mm versus 27.60 mm). A higher percentage of experimental patients started immunotherapy when offered (76.3% and 67.9%). Patients who received routine imaging after high-risk GEP test scores had an earlier recurrence diagnosis with lower tumor burden, leading to better clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2295-2302
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Dermatological Research
Volume315
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2023

Keywords

  • Cutaneous melanoma
  • Gene expression profile
  • Metastasis
  • Recurrence
  • Surveillance imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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