Safety and immunogenicity of immunotherapy with polymerized tree, grass, and ragweed in patients with multiple inhalant sensitivities

Leslie C. Grammer*, Martha A. Shaughnessy, Susan M. Finkle, John J. Shaughnessy, Roy Patterson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Immunotherapy with polymerized ragweed (PRW) and individually polymerized grasses (IPG) previously has been demonstrated to be safe and effective. We conducted this trial in order to assess safety and immunogenicity of individually polymerized trees (IPT) and to assess safety of concomitantly administering IPT, IPG, and PRW in patients with multiple inhalant sensitivities. Sixteen patients with typical tree pollinosis were recruited; all but one had grass pollinosis, and all had ragweed pollinosis. Patients were treated in 12 weekly visits with allergens to which they were sensitive, 48,850 PNU of IPT; 2668 AU (50,000 PNU) of PRW; and 48,850 PNU of IPG. There were no systemic reactions and no changes in laboratory parameters, including renal and hepatic functions with injections. Blood was drawn for immunologic studies before and after the injection series. There were significant rises in IgG titers by ELISA to each tree allergen administered, oak, elm, and box elder. There were significant rises in total antibody binding of ragweed AgE and rye grass group I in patients treated with PRW and IPG, respectively. Changes in IgE to oak, elm, box elder, AgE, and rye grass group I were minimal. In summary, IPT is safe, immunogenic, and can be administered concomitantly with PRW and IPG in patients with multiple inhalant sensitivities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-58
Number of pages6
JournalThe Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume77
Issue number1 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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