Satisfaction with Medications Prescribed for Osteoarthritis: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Patients and Their Physicians in the United States

Rebecca L. Robinson*, Thomas J. Schnitzer, Sophie Barlow, Mia Berry, Andrew G. Bushmakin, Joseph C. Cappelleri, Leslie Tive, Jessica Jackson, James Jackson, Lars Viktrup

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Satisfaction with medications prescribed for osteoarthritis (OA) varies; this study aimed to determine the factors associated with satisfaction in US patients and their physicians. Methods: This point-in-time study used the Adelphi OA Disease Specific Programme (physicians identified from public lists reported on nine consecutive patients diagnosed with OA [any joint]: physicians and patients completed questionnaires). Patient’s demographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics associated with patient-reported and physician-rated overall satisfaction with, and expectations of effectiveness of, medication for OA were assessed using multivariate linear regression. Results: Responses from 572 patients (mean age 64.9 years, 60.5% female) currently prescribed medication for OA and 153 physicians (81 primary care, 35 rheumatologists, 37 orthopedic surgeons) were analyzed. Pain intensity was moderate or severe for 59.4% of patients. Greater patient-reported overall satisfaction with medication was significantly associated with (standardized beta, 95% confidence interval) exercise (0.12, 0.03–0.20), comorbid other musculoskeletal or painful conditions (vs none) (0.15, 0.06–0.24), and physicians’ report that the best control had been achieved (0.12, 0.03–0.20); lack of efficacy was among factors associated with worse satisfaction. Greater patient-reported expectation of effectiveness was significantly associated with exercise (0.12, 0.03–0.21) and the most troublesome joint not being a knee, hip, or their back (0.08, 0.01–0.14). Greater physician-rated overall satisfaction with medication was significantly associated with their report that the best control had been achieved (0.18, 0.11–0.26), the most troublesome joint being a knee (0.08, 0.01–0.14), comorbid other musculoskeletal or painful conditions (0.07, 0.01–0.12), obesity (0.06, 0.00–0.11), and female patients (0.06, 0.00–0.11); lack of efficacy and adverse events/tolerability issues were among factors associated with worse satisfaction. For physicians, their report that the best control had been achieved (0.19, 0.11–0.27), the most troublesome joint being a knee (0.08, 0.00–0.15), improving (vs stable) OA (0.15, 0.07–0.24), and uncertain duration of OA (0.11, 0.02–0.21) were associated with greater perception that the medication was meeting patients’ efficacy expectations. Conclusion: Although efficacy was strongly associated with both patients’ and physicians’ satisfaction with medication, other factors were also important, including exercise (for patients), tolerability (for physicians), and knee OA (for physicians).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-208
Number of pages18
JournalPain and Therapy
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • Analgesics
  • Patient satisfaction
  • Prescription analgesic medication
  • Real-world clinical practice
  • Treatment satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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