"Saying one thing and doing another": Examining the impact of event order on hypocrisy judgments of others

Jamie Barden*, Derek D. Rucker, Richard E. Petty

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

68 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated whether the temporal order of people's expressed statements and their behaviors affected others' judgments of hypocrisy, and why. It was proposed that hypocrisy would be greater when a statement establishing a personal standard preceded a behavior violating that standard as opposed to the reverse order. This order effect occurred in three studies, generalizing across two topic areas (healthy living and safe sex) and for both normative and nonnormative statements (pro/anti-safe sex). Mediation analyses indicated that the reverse order mitigated against hypocrisy because the target's inconsistency was attributed to dispositional change. The discussion addresses additional variables likely to affect hypocrisy and the relationship of this research to hypocrisy paradigms in dissonance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1463-1474
Number of pages12
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume31
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

Keywords

  • Attribution
  • Hypocrisy
  • Impression formation
  • Order effect
  • Person perception
  • Social judgment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '"Saying one thing and doing another": Examining the impact of event order on hypocrisy judgments of others'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this