School finance reform and the distribution of student achievement

Julien Lafortune, Jesse Rothstein, Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We study the impact of post- 1990 school finance reforms, during the so- called "adequacy" era, on absolute and relative spending and achievement in low- income school districts. Using an event study research design that exploits the apparent randomness of reform timing, we show that reforms lead to sharp, immediate, and sustained increases in spending in low- income school districts. Using representative samples from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, we find that reforms cause increases in the achievement of students in these districts, phasing in gradually over the years following the reform. The implied effect of school resources on educational achievement is large.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-26
Number of pages26
JournalAmerican Economic Journal: Applied Economics
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

Fingerprint

Student achievement
School finance
School districts
Low income
Education
Event study
Research design
Randomness
Resources
Adequacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

Cite this

@article{4145626594f84ee8b9ff4a1553d42c21,
title = "School finance reform and the distribution of student achievement",
abstract = "We study the impact of post- 1990 school finance reforms, during the so- called {"}adequacy{"} era, on absolute and relative spending and achievement in low- income school districts. Using an event study research design that exploits the apparent randomness of reform timing, we show that reforms lead to sharp, immediate, and sustained increases in spending in low- income school districts. Using representative samples from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, we find that reforms cause increases in the achievement of students in these districts, phasing in gradually over the years following the reform. The implied effect of school resources on educational achievement is large.",
author = "Julien Lafortune and Jesse Rothstein and Schanzenbach, {Diane Whitmore}",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1257/app.20160567",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "1--26",
journal = "American Economic Journal: Applied Economics",
issn = "1945-7782",
publisher = "American Economic Association",
number = "2",

}

School finance reform and the distribution of student achievement. / Lafortune, Julien; Rothstein, Jesse; Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore.

In: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, Vol. 10, No. 2, 01.04.2018, p. 1-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - School finance reform and the distribution of student achievement

AU - Lafortune, Julien

AU - Rothstein, Jesse

AU - Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

PY - 2018/4/1

Y1 - 2018/4/1

N2 - We study the impact of post- 1990 school finance reforms, during the so- called "adequacy" era, on absolute and relative spending and achievement in low- income school districts. Using an event study research design that exploits the apparent randomness of reform timing, we show that reforms lead to sharp, immediate, and sustained increases in spending in low- income school districts. Using representative samples from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, we find that reforms cause increases in the achievement of students in these districts, phasing in gradually over the years following the reform. The implied effect of school resources on educational achievement is large.

AB - We study the impact of post- 1990 school finance reforms, during the so- called "adequacy" era, on absolute and relative spending and achievement in low- income school districts. Using an event study research design that exploits the apparent randomness of reform timing, we show that reforms lead to sharp, immediate, and sustained increases in spending in low- income school districts. Using representative samples from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, we find that reforms cause increases in the achievement of students in these districts, phasing in gradually over the years following the reform. The implied effect of school resources on educational achievement is large.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85045036456&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85045036456&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1257/app.20160567

DO - 10.1257/app.20160567

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 1

EP - 26

JO - American Economic Journal: Applied Economics

JF - American Economic Journal: Applied Economics

SN - 1945-7782

IS - 2

ER -