Segmental Liver Transplantation From Living Donors Report of the Technique and Preliminary Results in Dogs

Daniel Cherqui, Jean C. Emond*, Andrea Pietrabissa, Mireille Michel, Manuela Roncella, Silas B. Brown, Peter F. Whitington, Christoph E. Broelsch

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

A technique of orthotopic liver transplantation using a segmental graft from living donors was developed in the dog. Male mongrel dogs weighing 25-30 kg were used as donors and 10-15 kg as recipients. The donor operation consists of harvesting the left lobe of the liver (left medial and left lateral segments) with the left branches of the portal vein, hepatic artery and bile duct, and the left hepatic vein. The grafts are perfused in situ through the left portal branch to prevent warm ischemia. The recipient operation consists of two phases: 1 total hepatectomy with preservation of the inferior vena cava using total vascular exclusion of the liver and veno-venous bypass,2 implantation of the graft in the orthotopic position with anastomosis of the left hepatic vein to the inferior vena cava and portal, arterial and biliary reconstruction. Preliminary experiments consisted of four autologous left lobe transplants and nine non survival allogenic left lobe transplants. Ten survival experiments were conducted. There were no intraoperative deaths in the donors and none required transfusions. One donor died of sepsis, but all the other donor dogs survived without complication. Among the 10 grafts harvested, one was not used because of insufficient bile duct and artery. Two recipients died intraoperatively of air embolus and cardiac arrest at the time of reperfusion. Three dogs survived, two for 24 hours and one for 48 hours. They were awake and alert a few hours after surgery, but eventually died of pulmonary edema in 2 cases and of an unknown reason in the other. Four dogs died 2-12 hours postoperatively as a result of hemorrhage for the graft’s transected surface. An outflow block after reperfusion was deemed to be the cause of hemorrhage in these cases. On histologic examination of the grafts, there were no signs of ischemic necrosis or preservation damage. This study demonstrates the technical feasibility of living hepatic allograft donation. It shows that it is possible, in the dog, to safely harvest non ischemic segmental grafts with adequate pedicles without altering the vascularization and the biliary drainage of the remaining liver. We propose that this technique is applicable to human anatomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-204
Number of pages16
JournalHPB Surgery
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

Keywords

  • Liver transplantation
  • hepatectomy
  • live donors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Hepatology

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