Selectively distributed processing of visual object recognition in the temporal and frontal lobes of the human brain

M. Seeck, D. Schomer, N. Mainwaring, J. Ives, D. Dubuisson, H. Blume, R. Cosgrove, B. J. Ransil, M. ‐M Mesulam*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Evoked potentials to visually driven cognitive tasks were recorded through depth electrodes placed bilaterally within the amygdala, hippocampus, midtemporal and inferotemporal cortex, and lateral frontal cortex of 6 epileptic patients. Task‐related differential response patterns were used to identify the recording sites engaged by specific aspects of visual encoding. In this group of 6 patients, the amygdala was most frequently engaged in encoding the familiarity of faces; midtemporal and inferotemporal cortex, in encoding perceptual identity and object categorization; and lateral frontal cortex, in holding visual object information in working memory. The two aspects of encoding that most frequently engaged the hippocampal region were related to working memory and object categorization. The processing of complex visual knowledge is thus anatomically distributed but regionally specialized. These experiments also showed that identical input and output parameters can engage different areas of the brain depending on the nature of the instructional set.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)538-545
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of neurology
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Selectively distributed processing of visual object recognition in the temporal and frontal lobes of the human brain'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Seeck, M., Schomer, D., Mainwaring, N., Ives, J., Dubuisson, D., Blume, H., Cosgrove, R., Ransil, B. J., & Mesulam, M. M. (1995). Selectively distributed processing of visual object recognition in the temporal and frontal lobes of the human brain. Annals of neurology, 37(4), 538-545. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.410370417