Self-efficacy and ability to read as factors associated with antiretroviral therapy adherence in an HIV-infected population

Mark S. Dworkin*, Apurba Chakraborty, Diana Zychowski, Geri Donenberg, Richard Novak, Robert Garofalo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Determining the barriers and facilitators of antiretroviral adherence among former and current substance users may be useful in the creation of successful interventions that target this hard-to-reach population. We performed a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected patients (N = 123) prescribed antiretroviral therapy at four Chicago healthcare venues. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were performed to determine factors associated with non-adherence based on definitions of non-adherence (any missed doses) within the past 4-day, 14-day, and 1-month time periods. Factors consistently associated with non-adherence in bivariate and multivariate analyses, regardless of duration of non-adherence definition, were lower confidence in taking medication consistently and less self-reported ability to read. These data reveal the importance of self-efficacy and ability to read (rather than specific knowledge of CD4 and viral load definitions) in the design of interventions in a population of HIV-infected persons with significant substance use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1154-1164
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Volume29
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Keywords

  • HAART
  • antiretroviral medications
  • medication adherence
  • substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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