Self-reported sleep disturbances associated with procedural learning impairment in adolescents at ultra-high risk for psychosis

Jessica R. Lunsford-Avery*, Derek J. Dean, Vijay A. Mittal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sleep disturbance contributes to impaired procedural learning in schizophrenia, yet little is known about this relationship prior to psychosis onset. Adolescents at ultra high-risk (UHR; N = 62) for psychosis completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and a procedural learning task (Pursuit Rotor). Increased self-reported problems with sleep latency, efficiency, and quality were associated with impaired procedural learning rate. Further, within-sample comparisons revealed that UHR youth reporting better sleep displayed a steeper learning curve than those with poorer sleep. Sleep disturbances appear to contribute to cognitive/motor deficits in the UHR period and may play a role in psychosis etiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-163
Number of pages4
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume190
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Procedural learning
  • Prodromal
  • Psychosis
  • Schizophrenia
  • Sleep
  • Ultra high-risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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