SERI surgical scaffold, prospective clinical trial of a silk-derived biological scaffold in two-stage breast reconstruction: 1-year data

Neil A. Fine, Max Lehfeldt, John E. Gross, Susan Downey, Gabriel M. Kind, Gloria Duda, David Kulber, Rebecca Horan, Jeff Ippolito, Mark Jewell, Nolan Karp, Mihye Choi, Michael Newman, Lisa Jewell, Charles Spenler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: SERI Surgical Scaffold is a long-term bioresorbable silk-derived biological scaffold developed to provide soft-tissue support and repair. Methods: SURE-001 (ClinicalTrials.gov identification no. NCT01256502) is a prospective, single-arm study in the United States of patients undergoing twostage, implant-based breast reconstruction using SERI. Results: A total of 139 patients were enrolled and will be followed for 2 years; in this article, the authors report interim data on 71 patients followed for 1 year. Investigator satisfaction scores (mean ± SD) at 6 and 12 months were 9.2 ± 0.98 and 9.4 ± 0.91, respectively (10 = very satisfied). SERI was rated easy/ very easy to use in 98 percent or more of cases across five categories in stage I surgery. Patient satisfaction with the treated breast(s) (mean ± SD) was higher at 6 (4.3 ± 0.87; 5 = very satisfied) and 12 months (4.5 ± 0.82) compared with screening (3.6 ± 1.09; p < 0.0001). Key complication rates (per breast) were tissue necrosis (6.7 percent), seroma (5.7 percent), hematoma (4.8 percent), implant loss (3.8 percent), capsular contracture (1.9 percent), and breast infection (1.0 percent). None were attributed to SERI by the investigators. In 13 patients (14 breasts) who underwent unplanned radiation therapy, one complication was reported. Conclusions: In this interim report, high levels of investigator and patient satisfaction, and ease of use of SERI were reported. Prospectively collected complication rates were similar to those reported in primarily retrospective studies of two-stage, implant-based breast reconstructions using other implantable soft-tissue support materials such as acellular dermal matrices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-351
Number of pages13
JournalPlastic and reconstructive surgery
Volume135
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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