Serial evaluation of left ventricular function in congestive heart failure by measurement of peak aortic blood acceleration

Hani N. Sabbah, Mihai Gheorghiade, Stephen T. Smith, Diane M. Frank, Paul D. Stein*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Peak acceleration of blood in the ascending aorta, an index of global systolic left ventricular (LV) function, can be measured noninvasively using a continuous wave Doppler velocimeter applied suprasternally. The feasibility of this approach as a tool for detecting improvement of LV function was studied in 16 patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Measurements were made daily for 6 consecutive days. The daily variability of peak acceleration examined in 11 normal subjects was ±2 m/s/s. In 11 of 16 patients with CHF, peak acceleration increased more than 2 m/s/s by day 6 compared with day 1 (group 1). In 5 of 16 patients, peak acceleration remained unchanged (group 2). In group 1, peak acceleration was 11 ± 1 m/s/s on day 1 and Increased to 16 ± 1 m/s/s on day 6 (p < 0.001). In this group, CHF resolved by day 6 in 9 of 11 patients. In group 2, peak acceleration was 9 ± 1 m/s/s on day 1 and remained unchanged through day 6. In these 5 patients, the signs and symptoms of CHF persisted through day 6. The results suggest that peak acceleration measured noninvasively with continuous wave Doppler can detect improvement of LV function in patients with CHF. The approach provides a simple and reliable bedside means for serial evaluation of LV systolic function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-370
Number of pages4
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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