Serious Bacterial Infections in Young Febrile Infants With Positive Urinalysis Results

Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of bacteremia and/or bacterial meningitis in febrile ab infants #60 days of age with positive urinalysis (UA) results. METHODS: Secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of noncritical febrile infants #60 days between 2011 and 2019 conducted in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network emergency departments. Participants had temperatures $38C and were evaluated with blood cultures and had UAs available for analysis. We report the prevalence of bacteremia and bacterial meningitis in those with and without positive UA results. RESULTS: Among 7180 infants, 1090 (15.2%) had positive UA results. The risk of bacteremia was higher in those with positive versus negative UA results (63/1090 [5.8%] vs 69/6090 [1.1%], difference 4.7% [3.3% to 6.1%]). There was no difference in the prevalence of bacterial meningitis in infants #28 days of age with positive versus negative UA results (1% in both groups). However, among 697 infants aged 29 to 60 days with positive UA results, there were no cases of bacterial meningitis in comparison to 9 of 4153 with negative UA results (0.2%, difference -0.2% [-0.4% to -0.1%]). In addition, there were no cases of bacteremia and/or bacterial meningitis in the 148 infants #60 days of age with positive UA results who had the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network low-risk blood thresholds of absolute neutrophil count <4×103 cells/mm3 and procalcitonin <0.5 ng/mL. CONCLUSIONS: Among noncritical febrile infants #60 days of age with positive UA results, there were no cases of bacterial meningitis in those aged 29 to 60 days and no cases of bacteremia and/ or bacterial meningitis in any low-risk infants based on low-risk blood thresholds in both months of life. These findings can guide lumbar puncture use and other clinical decision making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere2021055633
JournalPediatrics
Volume150
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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