Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1-beta, p24 antigen concentrations and cd4+ cells at various stages of human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection in children

Moshe Arditi*, William Kabat, Ram Yogev

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

We measured the serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1-beta (IL-1-beta), p24 antigen, CD4+/CD8+ cells and immunoglobulins in 35 children at various stages of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Serum TNF-alpha concentrations were significantly higher in children with lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis and in children with mildly symptomatic illness than in asymptomatic children or children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In addition serum IL-1 concentrations were significantly higher in patients with lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis than in asymptomatic, mildly symptomatic, or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. Children with lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis had the highest serum TNF-alpha and IL-1 concentrations. Among symptomatic children serum TNF-alpha concentrations correlated positively with those of IL-1, and both were inversely related to the amount of p24 antigen. TNF-alpha values in excess of 50 pg/ ml were observed more frequently among patients with CD4+ cell count > 400/mm3 than in those with CD4+ cell count > 400/mm3. We did not find any association between elevated TNF-alpha concentrations and cachexia, opportunistic infections or progressive encephalopathy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)450-454
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1-beta, p24 antigen concentrations and cd4+ cells at various stages of human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection in children'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this