Severe renal dysfunction complicating cardiogenic shock is not a contraindication to mechanical support as a bridge to cardiac transplantation

Umesh N. Khot*, Micky Mishra, M. Hilal Yamani, Nicholas G. Smedira, Emil Paganini, Mike Yeager, Tiffany Buda, Patrick M. McCarthy, James B. Young, Randall C. Starling

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study investigated outcomes in patients with cardiogenic shock and severe renal dysfunction treated with ventricular assist devices (VAD) as a bridge to cardiac transplantation. BACKGROUND: Previous reports have documented poor survival in patients with cardiogenic shock and severe renal dysfunction treated with VAD. METHODS: We surveyed 215 consecutive patients who received a VAD from 1992 to 2000 and selected patients who had a serum creatinine ≥3.0 mg/dl at the time of VAD placement. Demographic, laboratory, and clinical outcome data were collected. RESULTS: Eighteen patients met the inclusion criteria. Mean serum creatinine at the time of VAD placement was 4.0 ± 0.7 mg/dl (range 3.0 to 5.2 mg/dl). Seven patients required temporary renal support with continuous venovenous hemodialysis (CVVHD). Eleven patients underwent cardiac transplantation. At six months post-transplantation, mean serum creatinine was 2.0 ± 0.6 mg/dl (range 1.3 to 3.5 mg/dl). None of the transplanted patients required subsequent renal support. Seven patients died with a VAD before transplantation. Three died early (<1 month) after VAD placement, and all three required CVVHD until death. Four patients survived for >1 month after VAD placement; all four had resolution of renal dysfunction with mean serum creatinine of 1.9 ± 1.2 mg/dl (range 0.8 to 3.6 mg/dl) without the need for renal support. Overall 30-day and six-month survival after VAD placement, survival to transplantation, and survival one year post-transplantation were similar to patients without severe renal dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: Contemporary use of VAD leads to resolution of severe renal dysfunction in most cardiogenic shock patients and comparable long-term outcomes to patients without renal dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)381-385
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 5 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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