Sex differential in the relationship of electrocardiographic ST-T abnormalities to risk of coronary death: 11.5 year follow-up findings of the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry

Y. Liao, K. Liu, A. Dyer, J. A. Schoenberger, R. B. Shekelle, P. Collette, J. Stamler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

The independent contributions of ST segment depression and/or T wave abnormality (ST-T abnormalities) on the baseline resting electrocardiogram to risk of 11.5 year coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality were explored among 9203 white men and 7818 white women who were 40 to 64 years old and without definite CHD at entry in the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry. At baseline, prevalence rates of ST-T abnormalities were age related for both sexes, and at every age the rate was higher in women than men (age-adjusted prevalence rates 12.3% and 8.1%, respectively). Univariate analysis showed that ST-T abnormalities were associated with significantly increased risk of death from CHD for both men and women. However, men with ST-T abnormalities had much greater age-adjusted and multiple risk factor-adjusted absolute excess risk and relative risk than women with such electrocardiographic abnormalities. When baseline age, diastolic pressure, serum cholesterol, cigarettes/day, history of diabetes, and baseline use of antihypertensive medication were included in the multivariate analysis, ST-T abnormalities remained significantly related to death from CHD in men but not women. The interaction term between sex and ST-T abnormalities was at a borderline level of statistical significance by Cox regression analysis. In conclusion, ST-T abnormalities indicate an increased risk of subsequent death from CHD independent of major coronary risk factors for middle-aged U.S. men, but this is not clearly so for women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-352
Number of pages6
JournalCirculation
Volume75
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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