Short Communication: Genetic Variation in Human IL10 Proximal Promoter and Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection in Mali, West Africa

Djeneba Dabitao*, Mamadou Dembele, Michael Urbanowski, Bourahima Kone, Mamadou Wague, Nadie Coulibaly, Yeya DIt Sadio Sarro, Bocar Baya, Drissa Goita, Sounkalo Dao, Michael Belson, Sabra L. Klein, Chad Achenbach, Jane L. Holl, Mahamadou DIakite, Seydou Doumbia, Jay H. Bream, William R. Bishai, Souleymane DIallo, Robert L. Murphy

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

It is now recognized that to fully understand the role of host genetic variation on susceptibility to HIV-1 infection, investigations must be extended to African populations. We sought to determine if genetic variation in IL10 are associated with HIV-1 infection in a West African cohort in Mali. HIV-infected and -uninfected individuals were genotyped for three common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located at positions -592 (C/A), -819 (C/T), and -1082 (G/A) of the IL10 promoter. We found that the ATA haplotype, which has been previously associated with low IL-10 expression, was the most represented in the cohort. Although we observed a trend toward an increased frequency of ATA/ATA carriage in HIV-infected compared with -uninfected individuals, the difference was not statistically significant. Similarly, individual IL10 SNPs were not significantly enriched in the HIV-infected group, suggesting that IL10 genetic variants are not associated with HIV-1 in this West African cohort from Mali.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-61
Number of pages5
JournalAIDS research and human retroviruses
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Africa
  • HIV
  • IL-10
  • Mali
  • SNPs
  • genetics
  • haplotypes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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