Short-term persistent depression following hip fracture: A risk factor and target to increase resilience in elderly people

Sheryl Itkin Zimmerman*, H. David Smith, Ann Gruber-Baldini, Kathleen M. Fox, J. Richard Hebel, John Kenzora, Gerald Felsenthal, Jay Magaziner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Persistent depression is a risk factor for poor recovery following hip fracture. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between depression and functional recovery at one year and to investigate which characteristics discriminate people who are at greatest risk of poor outcomes. A total of 272 people ages 65 and older were evaluated in the hospital after hip fracture and followed with standardized measures of affect and physical, instrumental, and social function. Depression was assessed during hospitalization and at two months. Participants who were persistently depressed through two months exhibited poorer recovery than others. It was not possible to differentiate those who remained depressed from those whose depression resolved. Results suggest that persistent depression as a marker for poor recovery generalizes beyond hip fracture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-195
Number of pages9
JournalSocial Work Research
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1999

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Elderly people
  • Hip fracture
  • Resilience
  • Risk factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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    Zimmerman, S. I., Smith, H. D., Gruber-Baldini, A., Fox, K. M., Hebel, J. R., Kenzora, J., Felsenthal, G., & Magaziner, J. (1999). Short-term persistent depression following hip fracture: A risk factor and target to increase resilience in elderly people. Social Work Research, 23(3), 187-195. https://doi.org/10.1093/swr/23.3.187