Similar patterns of learning and performance variability for human discrimination of interaural time differences at high and low frequencies

Yuxuan Zhang*, Beverly A. Wright

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sound source localization on the horizontal plane is primarily determined by interaural time differences (ITDs) for low-frequency stimuli and by interaural level differences (ILDs) for high-frequency stimuli, but ITDs in high-frequency complex stimuli can also be used for localization. Of interest here is the relationship between the processing of high-frequency ITDs and that of low-frequency ITDs and high-frequency ILDs. A few similarities in human performance with high- and low-frequency ITDs have been taken as evidence for similar ITD processing across frequency regions. However, such similarities, unless accompanied by differences between ITD and ILD performance on the same measure, could potentially reflect processing attributes common to both ITDs and ILDs rather than to ITDs only. In the present experiment, both learning and variability patterns in human discrimination of ITDs in high-frequency amplitude-modulated tones were examined and compared to previously obtained data with low-frequency ITDs and high-frequency ILDs. Both patterns for high-frequency ITDs were more similar to those for low-frequency ITDs than for high-frequency ILDs. These results thus add to the evidence supporting similar ITD processing across frequency regions, and further suggest that both high- and low-frequency ITD processing is less modifiable and more noisy than ILD processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2207-2216
Number of pages10
Journaljournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume121
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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