Similar trial-by-trial adaptation behavior across transhumeral amputees and able-bodied subjects

Reva E. Johnson, Konrad P. Kording, Levi J. Hargrove, Jonathon W. Sensinger

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

EMG control of powered upper limb prostheses is difficult and imprecise. One approach for improving control is to help amputees develop more accurate internal models of their prosthetic device. This may be facilitated by an intuitive mapping of neural signals to device movement, a way of providing sensory feedback, or training methods. A first step, arguably, is to understand how an amputation affects adaptation. Here we studied trial-by-trial adaptation in a simple target-directed task with transhumeral amputees and healthy controls. We found that adaptation behavior was indistinguishable between amputees using the residual limb, amputees using the intact limb, and able-bodied subjects. Transhumeral amputees completed the task with larger errors than able-bodied subjects, but there was, perhaps surprisingly, no difference between the residual and intact limb.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2015
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages771-774
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781467363891
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015
Event7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2015 - Montpellier, France
Duration: Apr 22 2015Apr 24 2015

Publication series

NameInternational IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER
Volume2015-July
ISSN (Print)1948-3546
ISSN (Electronic)1948-3554

Other

Other7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2015
CountryFrance
CityMontpellier
Period4/22/154/24/15

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Mechanical Engineering

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