Simulation-Based Course Improves Resident Comfort, Knowledge, and Ability to Manage Surgical Intensive Care Unit Patients

Noah Weingarten*, Alexandria Byskosh, Benjamin Stocker, Hannah Weiss, Howard Lee, Michael Masteller, Alex Johnston, Giang Quach, Courtney L. Devin, Nabil Issa, Joseph Anthony Posluszny

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Simulation-based education can augment residents' skills and knowledge. We assessed the effectiveness of a simulation-based course for surgery interns designed to improve their comfort, knowledge, and ability to manage common surgical critical care (SCC) conditions. Materials and methods: For 2 y, all first year residents (n = 31) in general surgery, urology, interventional radiology, and the integrated plastics, vascular, and cardiothoracic surgery training programs at our institution participated in a simulation-based course emphasizing evidence-based management of SCC conditions. Precourse and postcourse surveys and multiple-choice tests, as well as summative simulation tests, assessed interns' comfort, knowledge, and ability to manage SCC conditions. Changes in these measures were assessed with Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests. Factors associated with summative performance were determined by linear regression. Results: The course consisted of four simulation-based teaching sessions in year 1 and six in year 2. The course taught seven of the 18 core SCC conditions in the Surgical Council on Resident Education general surgery curriculum in year 1 and 10 in year 2. Interns' self-reported comfort, knowledge, and ability to manage each condition taught in the course increased (P < 0.02). Their knowledge of each condition, as assessed by written tests, also increased (P < 0.02). Their summative simulation test performance correlated with the number of course sessions attended (P < 0.03) and status as general surgery residents (P < 0.01). Conclusions: A simulation-based SCC training course for surgery interns that emphasizes evidence-based management of SCC conditions improves interns' comfort, knowledge, and ability to manage these conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-363
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume256
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Curriculum
  • Education
  • SCORE
  • SICU
  • Simulation
  • Surgical training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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