Simulation-Based educational module improves intern and medical student performance of closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures

Bennet A. Butler, Cort D. Lawton, Jamie Burgess, Earvin S. Balderama, Katherine A. Barsness, John F. Sarwark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Simulation-based education has been integrated into many orthopaedic residency programs to augment traditional teaching models. Here we describe the development and implementation of a combined didactic and simulation-based course for teaching medical students and interns how to properly perform a closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of a pediatric supracondylar humeral fracture. Methods: Subjects included in the study were either orthopaedic surgery interns or subinterns at our institution. Subjects all completed a combined didactic and simulation-based course on pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures. The first part of this course was an electronic (e)-learning module that the subjects could complete at home in approximately 40 minutes. The second part of the course was a 20-minute simulation-based skills learning session completed in the simulation center. Subject knowledge of closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of supracondylar humeral fractures was tested using a 30-question, multiple-choice, written test. Surgical skills were tested in the operating room or in a simulated operating room. Subject pre-intervention and post-intervention scores were compared to determine if and how much they had improved. Results: A total of 21 subjects were tested. These subjects significantly improved their scores on both the written, multiple-choice test and skills test after completing the combined didactic and simulation module. Prior to the module, intern and subintern multiple-choice test scores were significantly worse than postgraduate year (PGY)-2 to PGY-5 resident scores (p < 0.01); after completion of the module, there was no significant difference in the multiple-choice test scores. After completing the module, there was no significant difference in skills test scores between interns and PGY-2 to PGY-5 residents. Both tests were validated using the scores obtained from PGY-2 to PGY-5 residents. Conclusions: Our combined didactic and simulation course significantly improved intern and subintern understanding of supracondylar humeral fractures and their ability to perform a closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of these fractures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e128
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - American Volume
Volume99
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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