Single-sex schools, student achievement, and course selection: Evidence from rule-based student assignments in Trinidad and Tobago

Clement Kirabo Jackson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Existing studies on single-sex schooling suffer from biases because students who attend single-sex schools differ in unmeasured ways from those who do not. In Trinidad and Tobago, students are assigned to secondary schools based on an algorithm allowing one to address self-selection bias and estimate the causal effect of attending a single-sex school versus a similar coeducational school. While females with strong expressed preferences for single-sex schools have better 10th grade exam performance due to attending single-sex schools between grades 6 and10, most students perform no better at single-sex schools. Girls at single-sex-schools take fewer sciences courses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-187
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Public Economics
Volume96
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

Fingerprint

Assignment
Trinidad and Tobago
Student achievement
Rule-based
Causal effect
Self-selection bias
Schooling
Secondary school

Keywords

  • School quality
  • Single-sex schools
  • Student achievement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Finance
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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