"Siri, is this you?": Understanding young children's interactions with voice input systems

Silvia Lovato, Anne Marie Piper

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

  • 10 Citations

Abstract

The increasing pervasiveness of voice input systems in consumer devices (e.g., Apple's iOS Siri) creates the potential for young children to use features and access content that previously required the ability to read and write. However, whether and how young children use voice input systems and associated voice agents on mainstream devices has not been studied in detail. This paper reports preliminary findings from an online survey with parents about children's use of voice input systems and a content analysis of YouTube videos depicting child interaction with one popular voice input system. Our results reveal three primary ways in which children use voice input systems: exploration, to understand and relate to the voice agent and for fun; information seeking, related to fact-finding questions and information about their surrounding environment; and functional, as a means of operating the device. While our results are preliminary, they highlight a variety of opportunities and challenges voice input systems present for children and parents.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of IDC 2015
Subtitle of host publicationThe 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages335-338
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781450335904
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 21 2015
Event14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2015 - Boston, United States
Duration: Jun 21 2015Jun 24 2015

Other

Other14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2015
CountryUnited States
CityBoston
Period6/21/156/24/15

Fingerprint

Speech recognition
interaction
parents
Equipment and Supplies
Parents
online survey
Aptitude
content analysis
Malus
video
present
ability

Keywords

  • Children
  • Question asking
  • Speech recognition
  • Voice input

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education
  • Software

Cite this

Lovato, S., & Piper, A. M. (2015). "Siri, is this you?": Understanding young children's interactions with voice input systems. In Proceedings of IDC 2015: The 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children (pp. 335-338). [2771910] Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/2771839.2771910
Lovato, Silvia ; Piper, Anne Marie. / "Siri, is this you?" : Understanding young children's interactions with voice input systems. Proceedings of IDC 2015: The 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2015. pp. 335-338
@inproceedings{8ca9ff1e46474509a5914ca210690141,
title = "{"}Siri, is this you?{"}: Understanding young children's interactions with voice input systems",
abstract = "The increasing pervasiveness of voice input systems in consumer devices (e.g., Apple's iOS Siri) creates the potential for young children to use features and access content that previously required the ability to read and write. However, whether and how young children use voice input systems and associated voice agents on mainstream devices has not been studied in detail. This paper reports preliminary findings from an online survey with parents about children's use of voice input systems and a content analysis of YouTube videos depicting child interaction with one popular voice input system. Our results reveal three primary ways in which children use voice input systems: exploration, to understand and relate to the voice agent and for fun; information seeking, related to fact-finding questions and information about their surrounding environment; and functional, as a means of operating the device. While our results are preliminary, they highlight a variety of opportunities and challenges voice input systems present for children and parents.",
keywords = "Children, Question asking, Speech recognition, Voice input",
author = "Silvia Lovato and Piper, {Anne Marie}",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1145/2771839.2771910",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "335--338",
booktitle = "Proceedings of IDC 2015",
publisher = "Association for Computing Machinery, Inc",

}

Lovato, S & Piper, AM 2015, "Siri, is this you?": Understanding young children's interactions with voice input systems. in Proceedings of IDC 2015: The 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children., 2771910, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 335-338, 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2015, Boston, United States, 6/21/15. https://doi.org/10.1145/2771839.2771910

"Siri, is this you?" : Understanding young children's interactions with voice input systems. / Lovato, Silvia; Piper, Anne Marie.

Proceedings of IDC 2015: The 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2015. p. 335-338 2771910.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - "Siri, is this you?"

T2 - Understanding young children's interactions with voice input systems

AU - Lovato, Silvia

AU - Piper, Anne Marie

PY - 2015/6/21

Y1 - 2015/6/21

N2 - The increasing pervasiveness of voice input systems in consumer devices (e.g., Apple's iOS Siri) creates the potential for young children to use features and access content that previously required the ability to read and write. However, whether and how young children use voice input systems and associated voice agents on mainstream devices has not been studied in detail. This paper reports preliminary findings from an online survey with parents about children's use of voice input systems and a content analysis of YouTube videos depicting child interaction with one popular voice input system. Our results reveal three primary ways in which children use voice input systems: exploration, to understand and relate to the voice agent and for fun; information seeking, related to fact-finding questions and information about their surrounding environment; and functional, as a means of operating the device. While our results are preliminary, they highlight a variety of opportunities and challenges voice input systems present for children and parents.

AB - The increasing pervasiveness of voice input systems in consumer devices (e.g., Apple's iOS Siri) creates the potential for young children to use features and access content that previously required the ability to read and write. However, whether and how young children use voice input systems and associated voice agents on mainstream devices has not been studied in detail. This paper reports preliminary findings from an online survey with parents about children's use of voice input systems and a content analysis of YouTube videos depicting child interaction with one popular voice input system. Our results reveal three primary ways in which children use voice input systems: exploration, to understand and relate to the voice agent and for fun; information seeking, related to fact-finding questions and information about their surrounding environment; and functional, as a means of operating the device. While our results are preliminary, they highlight a variety of opportunities and challenges voice input systems present for children and parents.

KW - Children

KW - Question asking

KW - Speech recognition

KW - Voice input

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84961960788&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84961960788&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1145/2771839.2771910

DO - 10.1145/2771839.2771910

M3 - Conference contribution

SP - 335

EP - 338

BT - Proceedings of IDC 2015

PB - Association for Computing Machinery, Inc

ER -

Lovato S, Piper AM. "Siri, is this you?": Understanding young children's interactions with voice input systems. In Proceedings of IDC 2015: The 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 2015. p. 335-338. 2771910 https://doi.org/10.1145/2771839.2771910