Skin cancer prevention education for kidney transplant recipients

A systematic evaluation of Internet sites

June K. Robinson*, Murad Alam, Neda Ashourian, Misbah Khan, Roopal Kundu, Anne E. Laumann, Bethanee J. Schlosser, Simon Yoo, Elisa J. Gordon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Repeated patient education about skin cancer prevention is important to self-care after transplant. Objective: Examine educational materials for kidney transplant recipients available on the Internet that address sun protection and skin self-examination for early detection of squamous cell carcinoma. Design: Systematic review of Web sites for kidney transplant recipients endorsed by transplant physicians and dermatologists. Participants: An expert panel of 8 dermatologists providing care for kidney transplant recipients and 1 research medical anthropologist. Main Outcome Measures: Reading grade level, inclusion of people with skin of color, sufficient content to support effective sun protection, and description of 4 sun-protection strategies and skin self-examination. Results: Of the 40 sites identified, 11 contained information about sun protection or increased risk of any type of cancer. The Web sites had a ninth-grade median reading level (range, seventh grade to college senior). Interrater reliability for the 25-item assessment tool was assessed by Fleiss' kappa (κ = 0.87). Skin cancer risk was presented as relevant to those with fair skin. Sites recommended regular use of sunscreen with sun-protection factor of 15 or greater (n = 3) to reduce the risk of skin cancer (n = 4). Few sites recommended using protective clothing (n = 5), seeking shade (n = 4), and avoiding deliberate tanning with indoor or outdoor light (n = 1). Five sites recommended skin self-examination. Conclusion: Because many patients seek self-management information from the Internet, Web sites must provide more thorough educational information about skin cancer prevention and health promotion at a lower reading grade level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-349
Number of pages6
JournalProgress in Transplantation
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Fingerprint

Skin Neoplasms
Solar System
Self-Examination
Internet
Kidney
Education
Reading
Skin
Self Care
Sun Protection Factor
Protective Clothing
Tanning
Skin Pigmentation
Transplants
Sunscreening Agents
Patient Education
Health Promotion
Biomedical Research
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Cite this

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title = "Skin cancer prevention education for kidney transplant recipients: A systematic evaluation of Internet sites",
abstract = "Context: Repeated patient education about skin cancer prevention is important to self-care after transplant. Objective: Examine educational materials for kidney transplant recipients available on the Internet that address sun protection and skin self-examination for early detection of squamous cell carcinoma. Design: Systematic review of Web sites for kidney transplant recipients endorsed by transplant physicians and dermatologists. Participants: An expert panel of 8 dermatologists providing care for kidney transplant recipients and 1 research medical anthropologist. Main Outcome Measures: Reading grade level, inclusion of people with skin of color, sufficient content to support effective sun protection, and description of 4 sun-protection strategies and skin self-examination. Results: Of the 40 sites identified, 11 contained information about sun protection or increased risk of any type of cancer. The Web sites had a ninth-grade median reading level (range, seventh grade to college senior). Interrater reliability for the 25-item assessment tool was assessed by Fleiss' kappa (κ = 0.87). Skin cancer risk was presented as relevant to those with fair skin. Sites recommended regular use of sunscreen with sun-protection factor of 15 or greater (n = 3) to reduce the risk of skin cancer (n = 4). Few sites recommended using protective clothing (n = 5), seeking shade (n = 4), and avoiding deliberate tanning with indoor or outdoor light (n = 1). Five sites recommended skin self-examination. Conclusion: Because many patients seek self-management information from the Internet, Web sites must provide more thorough educational information about skin cancer prevention and health promotion at a lower reading grade level.",
author = "Robinson, {June K.} and Murad Alam and Neda Ashourian and Misbah Khan and Roopal Kundu and Laumann, {Anne E.} and Schlosser, {Bethanee J.} and Simon Yoo and Gordon, {Elisa J.}",
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T2 - A systematic evaluation of Internet sites

AU - Robinson, June K.

AU - Alam, Murad

AU - Ashourian, Neda

AU - Khan, Misbah

AU - Kundu, Roopal

AU - Laumann, Anne E.

AU - Schlosser, Bethanee J.

AU - Yoo, Simon

AU - Gordon, Elisa J.

PY - 2010/12/1

Y1 - 2010/12/1

N2 - Context: Repeated patient education about skin cancer prevention is important to self-care after transplant. Objective: Examine educational materials for kidney transplant recipients available on the Internet that address sun protection and skin self-examination for early detection of squamous cell carcinoma. Design: Systematic review of Web sites for kidney transplant recipients endorsed by transplant physicians and dermatologists. Participants: An expert panel of 8 dermatologists providing care for kidney transplant recipients and 1 research medical anthropologist. Main Outcome Measures: Reading grade level, inclusion of people with skin of color, sufficient content to support effective sun protection, and description of 4 sun-protection strategies and skin self-examination. Results: Of the 40 sites identified, 11 contained information about sun protection or increased risk of any type of cancer. The Web sites had a ninth-grade median reading level (range, seventh grade to college senior). Interrater reliability for the 25-item assessment tool was assessed by Fleiss' kappa (κ = 0.87). Skin cancer risk was presented as relevant to those with fair skin. Sites recommended regular use of sunscreen with sun-protection factor of 15 or greater (n = 3) to reduce the risk of skin cancer (n = 4). Few sites recommended using protective clothing (n = 5), seeking shade (n = 4), and avoiding deliberate tanning with indoor or outdoor light (n = 1). Five sites recommended skin self-examination. Conclusion: Because many patients seek self-management information from the Internet, Web sites must provide more thorough educational information about skin cancer prevention and health promotion at a lower reading grade level.

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