Sleep influences the severity of memory disruption in amnestic mild cognitive impairment: Results from Sleep self-assessment and continuous activity monitoring

Carmen E. Westerberg, Eric M. Lundgren, Susan M. Florczak, M. Marsel Mesulam, Sandra Weintraub, Phyllis C. Zee, Ken A. Paller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sleep is important for declarative memory consolidation in healthy adults. Sleep disruptions are typical in Alzheimer disease, but whether they contribute to memory impairment is unknown. Sleep has not been formally examined in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), which is characterized by declarative-memory deficits without dementia and can signify prodromal Alzheimer disease. We studied 10 aMCI patients and 10 controls over 2 weeks using daily sleep surveys, wrist-worn activity sensors, and daily recognition tests. Recognition was impaired and more variable in aMCI patients, whereas sleep was similar across groups. However, lower recognition of items learned the previous day was associated with lower subjective sleep quality in aMCI patients. This correlation was not present for information learned the same day and thus did not reflect nonspecific effects of poor sleep on memory. These results indicate that inadequate memory consolidation in aMCI patients is related to declines in subjective sleep indices. Furthermore, participants with greater across-night sleep variability exhibited lower scores on a standardized recall test taken prior to the 2-week protocol, suggesting that consistent sleep across nights also contributes to successful memory. Physiological analyses are needed to further specify which aspects of sleep in neurological disorders impact memory function and consolidation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-333
Number of pages9
JournalAlzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010

Keywords

  • Amnestic mild cognitive impairment
  • Declarative memory
  • Memory consolidation
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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