SlickFeel: Sliding and clicking haptic feedback on a touchscreen

Xiaowei Dai*, Jiawei Gu, Xiang Cao, Ed Colgate, Hong Z. Tan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

We present SlickFeel, a single haptic display setup that can deliver two distinct types of feedback to a finger on a touchscreen during typical operations of sliding and clicking. Sliding feedback enables the sliding finger to feel interactive objects on a touchscreen through variations in friction. Clicking feedback provides a key-click sensation for confirming a key or button click. Two scenarios have been developed to demonstrate the utility of the two haptic effects. In the first, simple button-click scenario, a user feels the positions of four buttons on a touchscreen by sliding a finger over them and feels a simulated key-click signal by pressing on any of the buttons. In the second scenario, the advantage of haptic feedback is demonstrated in a haptically-enhanced thumbtyping scenario. A user enters text on a touchscreen with two thumbs without having to monitor the thumbs' locations on the screen. By integrating SlickFeel with a Kindle Fire tablet, we show that it can be used with existing mobile touchscreen devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdjunct Proceedings of the 25th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST'12
Pages21-22
Number of pages2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 19 2012
Event25th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2012 - Cambridge, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 7 2012Oct 10 2012

Other

Other25th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2012
CountryUnited States
CityCambridge, MA
Period10/7/1210/10/12

Keywords

  • Clicking feedback
  • Haptic display
  • Sliding feedback
  • Touchscreen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software

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