Slowing the loss of physical function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with edaravone: Post hoc analysis of ALSFRS-R item scores in pivotal study MCI186-19

Benjamin Rix Brooks, Erik P. Pioro, Jonathan Katz, Fumihiro Takahashi, Koji Takei, Jeffrey Zhang, Stephen Apple*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Phase 3 study MCI186-19 demonstrated less loss of physical function with edaravone versus placebo, as measured by the revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) total score. A 1-point drop in an individual ALSFRS-R item may be clinically meaningful. We assessed ALSFRS-R item score changes to identify clinical features protected by edaravone treatment. Methods: Time-to-event analysis was used to assess the cumulative probabilities of reductions in ALSFRS-R item scores and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Assessment Questionnaire (ALSAQ-40) subdomain scores. Results: Edaravone use was accompanied by: (1) delayed drop of ≥1 point in ALSFRS-R item score for four items: salivation, walking, climbing stairs, orthopnea (unadjusted), or for two items: walking, climbing stairs (after Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons); (2) delayed score transition from 4 or 3 at baseline to ≤2 for five items: swallowing, eating motion, walking, climbing stairs, orthopnea (unadjusted), or for one item: climbing stairs (after Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons); and (3) delayed worsening of ALSAQ-40 domain scores representing daily living/independence, eating and drinking (unadjusted). Discussion: These post-hoc analyses identified the ALSFRS-R item scores and ALSAQ-40 domain scores that were associated with preserved gross motor function and health-related quality of life, respectively, after edaravone treatment. Limitations of post-hoc analyses should be considered when interpreting these results. We recommend that clinical trials employing the ALSFRS-R include this type of analysis as a pre-specified secondary outcome measure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-186
Number of pages7
JournalMuscle and Nerve
Volume65
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Physiology (medical)

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