Small bugs, big ideas: Teaching complex systems principles through agent-based models of social insects

Yu Guo*, Uri Wilensky

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Complex systems are challenging for students, especially younger students, to learn. In this paper, we argue that agent-based models (ABMs) of social insects provide an engaging and effective space for students to learn powerful ideas about complex systems. We designed a curricular unit called BeeSmart centering on ABMs of honeybees’ collective behavior. Preliminary results from an implementation at a high school showed that ABMs of social insects could be a promising approach to introduce complex systems to a younger audience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Artificial Life Conference 2016, ALIFE 2016
EditorsCarlos Gershenson, Tom Froese, Jesus M. Siqueiros, Wendy Aguilar, Eduardo J. Izquierdo, Sayama Hiroki
PublisherMIT Press Journals
ISBN (Electronic)9780262339360
StatePublished - 2016
Event15th International Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems, ALIFE 2016 - Cancun, Mexico
Duration: Jul 4 2016Jul 8 2016

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Artificial Life Conference 2016, ALIFE 2016

Conference

Conference15th International Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems, ALIFE 2016
Country/TerritoryMexico
CityCancun
Period7/4/167/8/16

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Modeling and Simulation

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