Snap Judgments: How Students Search the Web for Their Rights to Photograph in Public

Robin Hoecker*, Eszter Hargittai

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Citizens need civic literacy to make sense of the laws that govern them. How do citizens learn about their rights in an age of abundant online information? This study examines how a diverse group of 65 young adults-a generation of people who grew up in the digital age-use the Internet to assess their rights to public photography. The laws surrounding the right to photograph are complicated, yet these laws potentially affect many people as more and more carry devices with cameras and take pictures in public. Study results suggest that despite vast amounts of content available online, people turn to just a small number of sources, often accepting the advice without verification. A few respondents, however, recognize the potential complexity of the situation and approach the task more critically, sometimes consulting multiple sources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-273
Number of pages21
JournalCommunication Review
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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