Social ecological predictors of longitudinal HIV treatment adherence in youth with perinatally acquired HIV

Sylvie Naar-King*, Grace Montepiedra, Patricia Garvie, Betsy Kammerer, Kathleen Malee, Patricia A. Sirois, Lisa Aaron, Sharon L. Nichols

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To apply a social ecological model to explore the psychosocial factors prospectively associated with longitudinal adherence to antiretroviral treatment in youth perinatally infected with HIV. Methods Randomly selected youth, age 8 to <19 years old, completed cognitive testing and psychosocial questionnaires at baseline as part of a multisite protocol (N = 138). A validated caregiver-report measure of adherence was completed at baseline and 24 and 48 weeks after baseline. Results In multivariate analysis, youth awareness of HIV status, caregiver not fully responsible for medications, low caregiver well-being, adolescent perceptions of poor caregiver-youth relations, caregiver perceptions of low social support, and African American ethnicity were associated with nonadherence over 48 weeks. Conclusions Interventions focusing on caregivers and their interactions with the individual youth and extrafamilial system should be prioritized for prevention and treatment efforts to address nonadherence during the transition into adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)664-674
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

Keywords

  • HIV
  • antiretroviral therapy
  • children
  • patient adherence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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