Social network body size is associated with body size norms of South Asian adults

Nicola Lancki, Juned Siddique, John A. Schneider, Alka M. Kanaya, Kayo Fujimoto, Swapna S. Dave, Ankita Puri-Taneja, Namratha R Kandula

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims: To examine the association between social network body size and body size norms in South Asian adults. Methods: Participants (n = 766) from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study (2014–2018) provided detailed information about their five closest network members. Participants’ perceptions of their network members’ body sizes, their own body size (self-body size), and a healthy body size for men and women (body size norms) were assessed using the Stunkard 9-figure scale. Adjusted hierarchical linear regression models were used to examine associations between the average body size of network members and perceived body size norms. Results: Participants’ average age was 59.1 years (SD = 9.2) and 44.1% were women. Participants reported an average network body size of 4.0 (SD = 1.1). The average body size norm for male and female Stunkard images was 3.6 (SD = 1.0) and 3.4 (SD = 0.8), respectively. Social network body size was positively associated with increasing body size norms (β-coefficient = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.26, 0.36), independent of self-body size. Discussion: Social networks may influence body size norms in South Asian adults. Long-term follow up of the MASALA cohort will determine if social network body size and body size norms are associated with weight-control behaviors and weight change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-30
Number of pages6
JournalObesity Medicine
Volume11
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

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Body Size
Social Support
Linear Models
Atherosclerosis
Weights and Measures
Behavior Control

Keywords

  • Body size norms
  • Cardiovascular risk
  • Obesity
  • Social network influence
  • South Asian American

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Lancki, Nicola ; Siddique, Juned ; Schneider, John A. ; Kanaya, Alka M. ; Fujimoto, Kayo ; Dave, Swapna S. ; Puri-Taneja, Ankita ; Kandula, Namratha R. / Social network body size is associated with body size norms of South Asian adults. In: Obesity Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 11. pp. 25-30.
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Social network body size is associated with body size norms of South Asian adults. / Lancki, Nicola; Siddique, Juned; Schneider, John A.; Kanaya, Alka M.; Fujimoto, Kayo; Dave, Swapna S.; Puri-Taneja, Ankita; Kandula, Namratha R.

In: Obesity Medicine, Vol. 11, 01.09.2018, p. 25-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Schneider, John A.

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AU - Kandula, Namratha R

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