Social rank and adult male nutritional status: Evidence of the social gradient in health from a foraging-farming society

Victoria Reyes-García*, Thomas McDade, Jose Luis Molina, William Leonard, Susan N. Tanner, Tomas Huanca, Ricardo Godoy

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research with humans and non-human primate species has found an association between social rank and individual health. Among humans, a robust literature in industrial societies has shown that each step down the rank hierarchy is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Here, we present supportive evidence for the social gradient in health drawing on data from 289 men (18+ years of age) from a society of foragers-farmers in the Bolivian Amazon (Tsimane'). We use a measure of social rank that captures the locally perceived position of a man in the hierarchy of important people in a village. In multivariate regression analysis we found a positive and statistically significant association between social rank and three standard indicators of nutritional status: body mass index (BMI), mid-arm circumference, and the sum of four skinfolds. Results persisted after controlling for material and psychosocial pathways that have been shown to mediate the association between individual socioeconomic status and health in industrial societies. Future research should explore locally-relevant psychosocial factors that may mediate the association between social status and health in non-industrial societies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2107-2115
Number of pages9
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume67
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Bolivia
  • Nutrition
  • Social gradient
  • Social rank
  • Tsimane' Amerindians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

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