Socioeconomic differences in the effects of prayer on physical symptoms and quality of life

Rajni Banthia, Judith Tedlie Moskowitz*, Michael Acree, Susan Folkman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

The extent to which religiosity is related to well-being may differ as a function of race/ethnicity, education or income. We asked 155 caregivers to complete measures of religiosity, prayer, physical symptoms and quality of life. Lower education and, to a lesser extent, lower income were correlated with religiosity and prayer. There were few direct relationships of religiosity and prayer with quality of life and health symptoms. However, the relationships became significant when education and, to a lesser degree, income were taken into account. Prayer was associated with fewer health symptoms and better quality of life among less educated caregivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-260
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

Keywords

  • Caregivers
  • Education
  • Ethnicity
  • Income
  • Prayer
  • Religiosity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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