SOFT X‐RAY SCANNING MICROSCOPY: ITS PRACTICAL USE FOR ELEMENTAL MAPPING AT THE NSLS U15 BEAMLINE

C. Jacobsen, J. M. Kenney, J. Kirz, I. McNulty, R. J. Rosser*, F. Cinotti, H. Rarback, D. Shu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Scanning soft X‐ray microscopy offers several advantages over other forms of X‐ray microscopy. It subjects the specimen to the lower doses of radiation and by digitally recording the image, gives direct quantitative information on the absorption of the specimen as a function of position. Elemental maps can be produced easily by comparing images taken at different wavelengths, chosen to exploit X‐ray absorption edges or resonances. This technique was used to explore the distribution of calcium in 0.2 μm‐thick bone specimens, detecting concentrations of 5% by weight, with a spatial resolution of 0.2 μm. Progress in X‐ray sources in the form of undulators and in X‐ray optics indicates that soon the range of elements that can be mapped will be extended and the spatial resolution and elemental sensitivity will be improved by an order of magnitude.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-423
Number of pages3
JournalPhotochemistry and Photobiology
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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