Source of work area reduction following hemiparetic stroke and preliminary intervention using the ACT3D system

Theresa M. Sukal*, Michael D. Ellis, Julius P.A. Dewald

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of gravity increases the expression elbow/shoulder synergy patterns results in discoordination during movements following stroke. The Arm Coordination Training 3-D (ACT 3D) robotic system is a novel way of recording movement patterns while a subject generates varying amounts of shoulder abduction torque. This system is used to provide preliminary data that show reduced elbow extension and shoulder flexion capabilities as shoulder abduction requirements increase resulting in reduced work area at high shoulder abduction levels. Single subject data is highlighted to illustrate the application of an intervention aimed at progressively training subjects to overcome the effects of abnormal joint torque coupling on reaching abilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06
Pages177-180
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Event28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Aug 30 2006Sep 3 2006

Publication series

NameAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
ISSN (Print)0589-1019

Other

Other28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period8/30/069/3/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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