Specificity of phonological representations in U.S. English-speaking late talkers and typical talkers

Philip R. Curtis*, Christopher Ryne Estabrook, Megan Y. Roberts, Adriana Weisleder

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Late talkers are a heterogeneous group of children who experience delayed language development in the absence of other known causes. Late talkers show delays in expressive phonological development, but less is known about their receptive phonological development. In the current study, U.S. monolingual English-speaking typical talkers (TTs) (n = 23, mean age = 26.27 months, 57% male; 78.3% White) and late talkers (n = 22, mean age = 24.57 months, 59% male, 72.7% White) completed a Looking-While-Listening task to assess their sensitivity to mispronunciations. Results revealed that late talkers and TTs looked to the referent of a word for a shorter duration when it was mispronounced than when it was correctly pronounced, suggesting they were sensitive to mispronunciations. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in their sensitivity to mispronunciations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)771-792
Number of pages22
JournalInfancy
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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