Specifying the role of exposure to violence and violent behavior on initiation of gun carrying: A longitudinal test of three models of youth gun carrying

Richard Spano*, William Alex Pridemore, John Bolland

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two waves of longitudinal data from 1,049 African American youth living in extreme poverty are used to examine the impact of exposure to violence (Time 1) and violent behavior (Time 1) on first time gun carrying (Time 2). Multivariate logistic regression results indicate that (a) violent behavior (Time 1) increased the likelihood of initiation of gun carrying (Time 2) by 76% after controlling for exposure to violence at Time 1, which is consistent with the stepping stone model of youth gun carrying, and (b) youth who were both exposed to violence at Time 1 and engaged in violent behavior at Time 1 were more than 2.5 times more likely to initiate gun carrying at Time 2 compared to youth who had neither of these characteristics, which supports the cumulative risk model of youth gun carrying. The authors discuss the implications of these findings in clarifying the role of violence in the community on youth gun carrying and the primary prevention of youth gun violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-176
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Keywords

  • African American youth
  • exposure to violence
  • gun carrying
  • high-poverty neighborhoods
  • violent behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Specifying the role of exposure to violence and violent behavior on initiation of gun carrying: A longitudinal test of three models of youth gun carrying'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this