Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks in congenital and acquired temporal bone defects - A long-term follow-up

R. J. Wiet*, Alan G Micco, J. Zhao -c.

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Twelve patients presenting with tegmen defects and requiring surgical repair were retrospectively reviewed from 1982 to 1993. One half of the patients presented with a cerebro spinal fluid leak at some time in the course of their illness. Nine cases were considered to be acquired. secondary to previous mastoid surgery or trauma. All 9 had encephalocoeles. Three spontaneous leaks were considered congenital; 2 of these patients had encephalocoeles. This report represents a long-term follow-up of these cases. with an average follow-up of 7.6 years. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging technology, as well as contrast studies, have tremendously aided in diagnosis and planning of surgical repair. Nine repairs were done through a dual transmastoid and middle fossa approach, with the other 3 done via a transmastoid approach only. We favored temporalis muscle flaps and temporalis fascia over synthetic materials for defect repairs. The long-term results and complications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-102
Number of pages4
JournalSkull Base Surgery
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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